Scholarcast 3: Eddie Holt - W.B. Yeats, Journalism and the Revival


This lecture examines W.B. Yeats’s not inconsiderable body of writing for the newspapers which ranges from literary journalism to letters to the editor. Attention will focus on the tensions between his clear commitment to journalistic practice and his own avowed hostility to ‘the Ireland of the newspapers’.

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[Photograph of the bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power, RHA - profile, tilted.]


[Photograph of the bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power, RHA - profile, tilted.]

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[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - facing forward.]


[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - facing forward.]

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[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - 3/4 profile.]


[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - 3/4 profile.]

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[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - profile.]


[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - profile.]

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[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - profile.]


[Photograph of a bust of W. B. Yeats by sculptor Albert Power - profile.]

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Hermes: an illustrated university literary quarterly


An issue of the literary journal for the staff and students of University College, Dublin. A typical issue included essays, poetry, University College notes, College society notes, and reviews. This issue includes an article by William Keane on the Australian poets Adam Lindsay Gordan and Henry Clarence Kendall, as well as an article on W. B. Yeats by Aedan Cox.

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Scholarcast 16: Poems and Paradigms


In Poems and Paradigms Edna Longley argues that the archipelagic paradigm is crucial to the criticism of modern poetry in English. Quoting John Kerrigan on the expansive, multi-levelled, polycentric aspects of the literary and cultural field, she discussed five poems which display their archipelagic co-ordinates on the surface: W.B. Yeats’s Under Saturn (1919), Philip Larkin’s The Importance of Elsewhere (1955), W.S. Graham’s Loch Thom (1977), Edward Thomas’s The Ash Grove (1916) and Louis MacNeice’s Carrick Revisited (1945). For Longley, the poems’ deeper aesthetic dynamics epitomise how influences move around within the archipelago, and she particularly emphasises serial transformations of Wordsworth and Yeats. She sees archipelagic and national paradigms as complementary, but criticises the way in which national poetic canons marginalise border cases’, saying: If a poem doesn’t fit the paradigm, change the paradigm. She goes on to suggest that, in the mid twentieth century, the aesthetic significance of Yeats’s mature poetry was most significantly absorbed by MacNeice and by English poets such as Auden, Larkin, Ted Hughes and Geoffrey Hill. She ends by proposing that all this throws light on the archipelagic sources of Northern Irish poetry.

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