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Bealach, Bansha

Abstract: A collection of folklore and local history stories from Bealach, Bansha (school) (Ballagh, Co. Tipperary), collected as part of the Schools' Folklore Scheme, 1937-1938 under the supervision of teacher S. Meiscill.

Original reference: 0575/3

In collection The Schools’ Collection : County Tipperary schools

  1. There is a lis or fort in Ballinlough about a half mile S. W. of Bansha. (p. 215-216)
  2. This is a another incident Mr. Wall related to me concerning the fort referred to in the previous story:- 'My grandfather and a friend of his were putting out topdressing one day in the field next to fort.' (p. 217)
  3. The story is about a large stone which now lies at the side of the Bansha - Galbally road in the townland of Gortavoher. (p. 219-220)
  4. In Lisnagaul about two and a half miles from Bansha in the farm of Mr W. Bourke there is said to be gold gold buried in a fort there. (p. 221)
  5. The Miller was a very important person years ago. (p. 223-224)
  6. When I was a young man - about 40 years ago I used to play cards. I lived in Scart then. (p. 225-226)
  7. Athassal Abbey - Earl of Ruadh (p. 227)
  8. Caddwick's Well (p. 228)
  9. Fourpenny Road (p. 229)
  10. Dark Road (p. 229)
  11. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230)
  12. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230)
  13. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230-231)
  14. Con Murphy who lived on the Thomastown-Golden Road was cutting hay in the fort once and he was making cocks of it. A fairy wind ('sí gaoithe') and carried a cock away up in the air. (p. 232)
  15. Leinster Road (p. 232)
  16. Green Road (p. 232)
  17. Pound of Meal (p. 233)
  18. Thomastown Castle (p. 234-235)
  19. This is a true ghost-story. It was related to me by Mrs M. Fitzgerald, Golden, Co. Tipperary. (p. 236-238)
  20. Castle Mary (p. 239-240)
  21. Ashe Family (p. 241)
  22. Moore of Ashgrove House (p. 242-243)
  23. Ashe Family (p. 244-245)
  24. The celebrated beauty of Bansha. The colour of her hair to amber. I compare and her stature like the cedar of Hydea. (p. 246)
  25. Wren's Day (p. 248-249)
  26. Riddles (p. 250-255)
  27. Old Houses (p. 257-258)
  28. Keating Eviction (p. 259-261)
  29. There is a woman named Mrs Edmond O' Dwyer, living in Booleen, Bansha and she told me how her mother used to make candles eighty years ago. (p. 262-263)
  30. Local Industries (p. 264-265)
  31. Coopers - Keelers (Ciléir) (p. 265-266)
  32. Cooler - Keeler (p. 266)
  33. Weaving (p. 267)
  34. The last Hedge-Schoolmaster to teach in the district was dressed in the following manner. (p. 268)
  35. Darby Ryan - The Bansha Poet (p. 269-271)
  36. Mr James Wall of Bansha told me about the following people whom he knew about 50 years. (p. 272)
  37. Darby Ryan - The Bansha Poet (p. 273-275)
  38. Ashgrove's Sporting Green (p. 276-279)
  39. Sweet Kate of Ardobreen (p. 280-281)
  40. Dawson's Seat (p. 282-285)
  41. Fox Chase (p. 286-291)
  42. Will (p. 291-293)
  43. Bithiúnach an Bhricfeasta (p. 294-295)
  44. The following are some of the Irish terms used by the late 'Het' Grogan. (p. 295-296)
  45. I have here some stray verses which I took down from one Domhnaillín Beag Ó Riain of Ros an Droichid, An Bháinseach, about 1905. (p. 297-299)
  46. The following song I got from Mr Seán Grogan, Longford Technical School. It was written by Darby Ryan, Poet, of Ashgrove, Bansha Co. Tipperary on a 'Saor-Seán' called Tomás Ó Duibhir. (p. 300)
  47. The following is another verse taken down from Domhnaillín Beag Ó Riain and said by him to have been composed by Darby Ryan. (p. 301)
  48. Is fearr an sean-dhíól na sean-fhalaí... (p. 301)
  49. There is a lis or fort in Ballinlough about a half mile S. W. of Bansha. (p. 215-216)
  50. This is a another incident Mr. Wall related to me concerning the fort referred to in the previous story:- 'My grandfather and a friend of his were putting out topdressing one day in the field next to fort.' (p. 217)
  51. The story is about a large stone which now lies at the side of the Bansha - Galbally road in the townland of Gortavoher. (p. 219-220)
  52. In Lisnagaul about two and a half miles from Bansha in the farm of Mr W. Bourke there is said to be gold gold buried in a fort there. (p. 221)
  53. The Miller was a very important person years ago. (p. 223-224)
  54. When I was a young man - about 40 years ago I used to play cards. I lived in Scart then. (p. 225-226)
  55. Athassal Abbey - Earl of Ruadh (p. 227)
  56. Caddwick's Well (p. 228)
  57. Fourpenny Road (p. 229)
  58. Dark Road (p. 229)
  59. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230)
  60. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230)
  61. Rathcloheen - Ráth Cloichín (p. 230-231)
  62. Con Murphy who lived on the Thomastown-Golden Road was cutting hay in the fort once and he was making cocks of it. A fairy wind ('sí gaoithe') and carried a cock away up in the air. (p. 232)
  63. Leinster Road (p. 232)
  64. Green Road (p. 232)
  65. Pound of Meal (p. 233)
  66. Thomastown Castle (p. 234-235)
  67. This is a true ghost-story. It was related to me by Mrs M. Fitzgerald, Golden, Co. Tipperary. (p. 236-238)
  68. Castle Mary (p. 239-240)
  69. Ashe Family (p. 241)
  70. Moore of Ashgrove House (p. 242-243)
  71. Ashe Family (p. 244-245)
  72. The celebrated beauty of Bansha. The colour of her hair to amber. I compare and her stature like the cedar of Hydea. (p. 246)
  73. Wren's Day (p. 248-249)
  74. Riddles (p. 250-255)
  75. Old Houses (p. 257-258)
  76. Keating Eviction (p. 259-261)
  77. There is a woman named Mrs Edmond O' Dwyer, living in Booleen, Bansha and she told me how her mother used to make candles eighty years ago. (p. 262-263)
  78. Local Industries (p. 264-265)
  79. Coopers - Keelers (Ciléir) (p. 265-266)
  80. Cooler - Keeler (p. 266)
  81. Weaving (p. 267)
  82. The last Hedge-Schoolmaster to teach in the district was dressed in the following manner. (p. 268)
  83. Darby Ryan - The Bansha Poet (p. 269-271)
  84. Mr James Wall of Bansha told me about the following people whom he knew about 50 years. (p. 272)
  85. Darby Ryan - The Bansha Poet (p. 273-275)
  86. Ashgrove's Sporting Green (p. 276-279)
  87. Sweet Kate of Ardobreen (p. 280-281)
  88. Dawson's Seat (p. 282-285)
  89. Fox Chase (p. 286-291)
  90. Will (p. 291-293)
  91. Bithiúnach an Bhricfeasta (p. 294-295)
  92. The following are some of the Irish terms used by the late 'Het' Grogan. (p. 295-296)
  93. I have here some stray verses which I took down from one Domhnaillín Beag Ó Riain of Ros an Droichid, An Bháinseach, about 1905. (p. 297-299)
  94. The following song I got from Mr Seán Grogan, Longford Technical School. It was written by Darby Ryan, Poet, of Ashgrove, Bansha Co. Tipperary on a 'Saor-Seán' called Tomás Ó Duibhir. (p. 300)
  95. The following is another verse taken down from Domhnaillín Beag Ó Riain and said by him to have been composed by Darby Ryan. (p. 301)
  96. Is fearr an sean-dhíól na sean-fhalaí... (p. 301)
Origin information
Ballagh, Co. Tipperary
Date created:
Type of Resource
text
Physical description
1 chapter (vol. 575, p. 214-301)
Languages
English  
Genre
Chapter
Subject
Folklore--Ireland--Tipperary
Roads   linked data (lcsh)
Ringforts   linked data (lcsh)
Ireland--History--Famine, 1845-1852
Dissenters, Religious--Legal status, laws, etc.
Land use   linked data (lcsh)
Folk poetry   linked data (lcsh)
Saint Stephen's Day   linked data (lcsh)
Riddles   linked data (lcsh)
Dwellings--Folklore
Candlemaking   linked data (lcsh)
Occupations   linked data (lcsh)
Coopering   linked data (afset)
Agriculture   linked data (lcsh)
Textile industry   linked data (lcsh)
Foxes--Folklore
School location
BallaghAn BealachBallaghTempleneiryClanwilliamTipperary
Location
https://doi.org/10.7925/drs1.duchas_4922276
Location
University College Dublin. National Folklore Collection UCD .

Original reference: 0575/3

Suggested credit
"The Schools' Manuscript Collection: County Tipperary schools," held by the National Folklore Collection UCD. © Digital content by University College Dublin, published by UCD Library, University College Dublin <http://digital.ucd.ie/view/duchas:49222765>
Funding
Supported by funding from the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht (Ireland), University College Dublin, and the National Folklore Foundation (Fondúireacht Bhéaloideas Éireann), 2014-2016.
Record source
Metadata creation date: 2014/2016 — Metadata created by Fiontar, Dublin City University, in collaboration with the National Folklore Collection UCD and UCD Library. Original Fiontar metadata converted into MODS by UCD Library.

Rights & Usage Conditions

Creative Commons License
Bealach, Bansha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Copyright of the original resource: University College Dublin

To use for commercial purposes, please contact the National Folklore Collection, UCD - See: http://n2t.net/ark:/87925/h1cc0xm5