19th Century Social History Pamphlets Collection


Collection of pamphlets relating to 19th century Irish social history, particularly the themes of education, health, famine, poverty, business and communications.

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The Collected Letters of Nano Nagle


A collection of the surviving letters of Honora (Nano) Nagle (1718-1784), foundress of the Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary (PBVM). Nano Nagle brought the Ursuline congregation to Ireland, before founding the Presentations. This collection represents a digital reunification of the surviving letters. A cousin of Edmund Burke, Nano was a member of a prominent Catholic landowning family in Munster. The material is collated from three separate archival collections: the Presentation Sisters Congregational Archives, Cork (PSCA); the archives of the Presentation Convent, George's Hill, Dublin; and the Presentation Archives, San Francisco, USA. Within the PSCA, there are letters originally belonging to the Archives of the Ursuline Convent, Blackrock, Cork; these letters were gifted to the Irish Presentation Sisters on the occasion of the tercentenary of the birth of Nano Nagle (2018). There is also one letter that was gifted by the Presentation Convent, New Windsor, USA, on the occasion of the tercentenary. The digital collection comprises of seventeen manuscript letters; the letters are from Nano Nagle to Eleanor Fitzsimons (later Sr. Angela Fitzsimons), an Irish religious novice in Paris, and from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally, educator of the poor, in Dublin.

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History and regulations. The school of physic in the university of Dublin and list of medical graduates.


History and regulations. The school of physic in the university of Dublin and list of medical graduates.

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An essay on education and the state of Ireland / by An Irish Catholic [ie. James Warren Doyle] ; with explanatory remarks by W. J. FitzPatrick.


An essay on education and the state of Ireland / by An Irish Catholic [ie. James Warren Doyle] ; with explanatory remarks by W. J. FitzPatrick.

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The alternative: or, How are the poor to be educated?


The alternative: or, How are the poor to be educated?

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The upas tree; or, an alternative for surrender or coercion.


The upas tree; or, an alternative for surrender or coercion.

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A few suggestions addressed to the clergy upon the present state of the question respecting national education in Ireland / by Charles Richard Elrington.


A few suggestions addressed to the clergy upon the present state of the question respecting national education in Ireland / by Charles Richard Elrington.

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Reasons for refusing to co-operate with the Board of National Education restated, and addressed to the clergy / by William Le Poer Trench.


Reasons for refusing to co-operate with the Board of National Education restated, and addressed to the clergy / by William Le Poer Trench.

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[Circular letter from Bartholomew Woodlock, Rector, regarding the Annual Collection of the Catholic University of Ireland.]


[Circular letter from Bartholomew Woodlock, Rector, regarding the Annual Collection of the Catholic University of Ireland.]

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Essay on the present state of manners and education among the lower class of the people of Ireland and the means of improving them.


Essay on the present state of manners and education among the lower class of the people of Ireland and the means of improving them.

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Convent Schools. Correspondence / written by Rev. Thomas Quin, P.P., Rasharkin (Late of St. Peter's, Belfast)


Convent Schools. Correspondence / written by Rev. Thomas Quin, P.P., Rasharkin (Late of St. Peter's, Belfast)

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally apologising for not replying to her letter sooner and expressing regret that her precarious finances would not allow her undertake a foundation in St. Michan's Parish, Dublin. She hopes that Mulally lives long enough to see the Sisters of Charitable Instruction established in that city some day. Letter highlights importance of word of mouth as Miss Fitzsimons has updated Nagle on Mulally's health. Nagle reports that the lady recommended by Mulally has settled in happily, and offers to pay for Miss Corballis to visit Cork for respite. She informs Mulally that she has dismissed some of her lay teachers as they were neglecting the children and taught "only for bread". She communicates her aspirations for the nuns, “wan thing I am resolv’d to make a rule, among us, is that we never dine abroad, or visit or go ab[road] only to the chaple, the schools or business…I hope we will show the world, that nothing makes us go out only when charity oblige us”.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Copy letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally welcoming Mulally and Miss (Ann) Corballis' return to health and expressing hope that they will accept the Rule of the Sisters of the Charitable Instruction; if it is not God's will that Mulally and her companions will take vows, they can still rely on the Sisters in Cork to do all in their power to establish a foundation in "the metropolise". Nagle refers to "many disagreeable circumstances", the convent under construction in Cork which she hopes will attract young ladies with substantial dowries, and the reception of a young aspirant of great merit.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Fitzsimons


Letter from Nano Nagle to Miss [Eleanor] Fitzsimons. Nagle reflects on herself and believes she has many faults. She compares the former novice mistress in the Ursuline monastery in Paris to the mustard seed in the Gospel, and expresses hope that the Cork foundation will succeed with her at the helm. She reports on sending boys to the West Indies on missionary work and mentions that the children are brought up to be fond of instructing. She also assures Miss Fitzsimons that she knows that she will take diligent care of the young ladies (novices) and requests her to convey her compliments to the superior, novice mistress, former novice mistress, and young ladies. Nagle tells Fitzsimons that she does not feel fatigue in relation to the school and requests the novice not to be uneasy about her physical health, though she does suffer a great deal in mind.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally informing her of the contents of a letter from her sister, Mrs (Elizabeth) French, regarding her conversation with Miss Bellew in relation to the claim on the Coppinger bequest for funds to support a Dublin foundation. Nagle apologises for the brevity of the letter.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally indicating that she has set £7 aside to be sent to Dublin. Nagle chides Mulally for falling into dejection, “I dont approve of your disponding so much”, and writes that even if neither of them live to see their work prosper during their lifetimes, hopefully it will succeed after their deaths "and be of universale service to the kingdome". She also describes the reception of a very promising novice and assures Mulally of the community's most affectionate compliments. Whereas all previous letters to Mulally were addressed “Dear Madam”, this last extant letter, written just over a year before Nagle's death, opens with “My Dear's friend”.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally following the latter's three week visit to Cork. Nagle regrets that her preoccupation with her nieces, who came down from Galway on their way to Cambrai, France, had prevented her from taking full advantage of Mulally's presence. To add to the dilemma, the girls' father, Mr. (Robert) French, had injured his leg in Spa, Southern Netherlands, so could not meet his daughters at Cambrai. She also refers to a prospective postulant who is involved in a lawsuit against a family member who has spent part of her dowry. Nagle reports that she has asked her sister, Mrs. (Elizabeth) French, to prevail upon her friends, the Bellews, to release some of a hoped-for bequest left by Mrs. Elizabeth Coppinger, Rossmore, Cork.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Fitzsimons


Letter from Nano Nagle to Miss [Eleanor] Fitzsimons noting the writer's anxiety at not receiving letters from Fitzsimons or Dr. Moylan. Nagle comments that the proposed date of the novices’ arrival in Cork has not yet been fixed and discusses the problem of finding a professed religious to act as superior. A letter has been sent to Paris seeking a “categorical answer” as to whether the intended journey to Cork will go ahead. The author offers Miss Fitzsimons financial advice and recalls her own monetary woes, she notes that “money is at present so scarce, and such a run on the Bankers in this kingdome, that people cant get what is due to them”. Nagle shows her endearing concern for Mary Kavanagh, who is now teaching the poor children of Paris, and communicates her disappointment that the Ursulines will not come to Cork that winter.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally indicating that, at the behest of Dr. Moylan, she had taken in three women to assist in her education ministry the previous Christmas. She reveals that two of the women will establish a foundation in County Kerry and encloses a copy of their rule, "its called the sisters of the charitable instruction of the sacred heart of Jesus...I could wish that we may unite in this society, and am confident the great God will direct you to what is most for his glory".

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Fitzsimons


Letter from Nano Nagle to Miss [Eleanor] Fitzsimons giving an account of a "very desirable" young lady (Miss Lawless) whom she is seeking to take on in Cork. The lady's father is strongly opposed to her taking the veil and he has offered her a substantial sum of money should she reconsider and marry. The father's uncertainty also reflects the wider political climate of the period, Nagle notes "...he says there is a probability in France they may Demolish all the Monasteries". Nagle affirms Miss Fitzsimons and advises her to choose "any young lady you think proper" to enter the novitiate in Paris. Nagle's agitation over bringing the Ursulines to Cork is also apparent, "I hope your fortitude will bring you true all crosses and put a happy conclusion to this foundation".

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Fitzsimons


Letter sent from Bath, England, written while Nano is visiting her brothers there. She alludes to previous correspondence which detailed the foundation of her first schools in Cork, and how she withheld this from her family who until lately were uninformed of her work. While aware that her actions run contrary to Penal Laws, she is determined to continue. Nagle also writes that she has recently objected to a suggestion put forth by Mr. [Bryan Keating], merchant, South Mall, Cork, and Dr. [John] Butler, Bishop of Cork, to seek Protestant approval for the new Ursuline foundation in Cork; she leaves it to Miss [Eleanor] Fitzsimons to judge.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally in which she describes taking possession of her convent on 15 July 1780. The women were prevented from moving in immediately because the rear wall of the property had to be broken in order for carts to come in and deliver stones to build a "garden wall for the ladies". Nagle refers to the anti-Catholic Gordon Riots in London and her fear that "the same contagious frenzy may break out in this kingdome". She also discusses her dismissal of Miss Wolf, conveys greetings from Dr. Moylan, sends news of mutual acquaintances, and reports an improvement in her eye condition.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Fitzsimons


Letter from Nano Nagle to Miss [Eleanor] Fitzsimons expressing her pleasure at receiving another letter from her and hoping they will meet in person soon. Nagle mentions her delight that Fitzsimons will be professed in Cork, and that the former novice mistress of the Ursuline monastery in Paris has consented to lead the new foundation in Ireland. She notes that [Francis] Moylan will do everything in his power to assist with this foundation. Nano is troubled to hear of her cousin's (Margaret Nagle) "histirick" or propensity to develop violent fits. The issue is causing some disagreement within the Ursuline community, who are under the impression that the disorder is contagious.

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Nano Nagle writing to Miss Mulally


Letter from Nano Nagle to Teresa Mulally describing the manner of Miss Brady's departure from the convent in Cork. Nagle was concerned that the Ursulines would take Brady in as she has a fortune, so she requested Dr. Butler to intercede on her behalf; the Ursulines have agreed not to take as postulants any girls that Nano has received. Nagle tells Mulally that Miss Creagh, who appears to have delivered many letters between the two correspondents, will explain the circumstances around Brady's departure in more detail. Nagle also informs her that she has not heard anything further from Mrs. French regarding her conversations with Miss Bellew.

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