Maxwell writing to French reflecting on the Sheehy-Skeffington case and other incidents


Handwritten copy of letter to Maxwell to French. Reflects on the Francis Sheehy-Skeffington case and other 'regrettable incidents' and states 'In my humble judgement the Government of Ireland is rotten from A to Z…The Irish Constabulary is a farce…a magnificent body of men certainly but singularly out of sympathy with the people…in my opinion you will never rule Ireland from Dublin Castle. There is far too much reporting & nothing happening…'.

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Maxwell writing to Asquith about the death of Francis Sheehy-Skeffington


Holograph letter from Maxwell, Headquarters, Parkgate, to Asquith on the death of Francis Sheehy-Skeffington. Also provides a breakdown of the number of troops in Ireland, excluding the 59th Division.

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Despatch from Maxwell to Lord Kitchener concerning Francis Sheehy-Skeffington


Typescript copy of despatch from Maxwell, Headquarters, Irish Command, Parkgate, Dublin to Lord Kitchener concerning the execution of Francis Sheehy-Skeffington by Captain J.C. Bowen-Colthurst, and other less serious incidents, due to the inexperience and 'jumpiness' of the British troops. Also reports on the progress of mobile columns dealing with 'Sinn Feiners and Citizen Army' members around the country and general reaction in Dublin to the Rising. 'I have done nothing vindictive, but the list of casualties suffered by the Army, Police and Civilians is sufficiently convincing of the serious nature of the rebellion, and had it not been promptly dealt with, and had the rebels been able to seize, acquire or produce more arms, the rebellions would have assumed a much more serious character and I doubt if Redmond & Co. would have been able to keep the National Volunteers from joining in'. Includes a 'Short History of rebels on whom it has been necessary to inflict the supreme penalty'.

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


An issue of the University College Dublin magazine, which aimed to be a record of University life. Contributors were mainly University staff and students. A typical issue includes an editorial, articles of a literary or humorous nature, book reviews, notes from University societies, and reports from schools, in particular the Medical School. This issue includes discussion of the pamphlet containing the essays " A forgotten aspect of the University question" by Francis Sheehy-Skeffington and "The day of rabblement" by James Joyce and also an article by Seoirse Mac Fhlannchadha (George Clancy).

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


An issue of the University College Dublin magazine, which aimed to be a record of University life. Contributors were mainly University staff and students. A typical issue includes an editorial, articles of a literary or humorous nature, book reviews, notes from University societies, and reports from schools, in particular the Medical School. This issue includes articles by Uan Uladh (Úna Ní Fhaircheallaigh / Agnes Winifred O'Farrelly) and James Joyce, and a letter to the editor from Francis Sheehy-Skeffington.

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


An issue of the University College Dublin magazine, which aimed to be a record of University life. Contributors were mainly University staff and students. A typical issue includes an editorial, articles of a literary or humorous nature, book reviews, notes from University societies, and reports from schools, in particular the Medical School.

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


An issue of the University College Dublin magazine, which aimed to be a record of University life. Contributors were mainly University staff and students. A typical issue includes an editorial, articles of a literary or humorous nature, book reviews, notes from University societies, and reports from schools, in particular the Medical School. This issue includes an article by Uan Uladh (Úna Ní Fhaircheallaigh / Agnes Winifred O'Farrelly) and a letter to the editor from Francis Sheehy-Skeffington.

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


An issue of the University College Dublin magazine, which aimed to be a record of University life. Contributors were mainly University staff and students. A typical issue includes an editorial, articles of a literary or humorous nature, book reviews, notes from University societies, and reports from schools, in particular the Medical School. This issue includes a mention in "Book notes and notices" of James Joyce's essay about Clarence Mangan, previously published in the journal (May 1902).

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St. Stephen's: a record of University life


St. Stephen's was a University College Dublin magazine started in 1901. The contributors and editorial staff included names that would later become important figures in Irish literary, political, and educational circles. Initially edited by Hugh Kennedy, the magazine was subsequently edited by Felix Hackett, Thomas Kettle, Constantine Peter Curran, John Kennedy, and Francis Cruise O'Brien. Contributors were mainly staff and students of the University, among them James Joyce, Patrick Pearse, Francis Sheehy-Skeffington, George Sigerson, and Patrick J. Little. The magazine was issued monthly during term. The magazine ceased publication in May 1906, but was re-started in 1960. This collection covers the initial volumes from 1901-1906.

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